A South Melbourne & Point Cook Physical Therapy Clinics Putting You First.Don’t Put Up With Pain. Start Healing Now.

    South Melbourne
  • 300 Albert Road
  • South Melbourne VIC 3205
    Point Cook
  • 220 Point Cook Road
  • Point Cook VIC 3030
    Opening Hours
  • Mon to Fri 8:00am – 6:00pm
  • Saturday 8:00am – 1:00pm

Anatomy of the Elbow

The forearm muscles that bend the wrist back are attached and connected by a single tendon. Tendons connect muscles to bone.

Tendons have high tensile strength. This means they can withstand high forces that pull on both ends of the tendon. When muscles work, they pull on one end of the tendon. The other end of the tendon pulls on the bone, causing the bone to move. The constant pull on these muscles and tendons causes general wear and tear.

The olecranon bursa, typically the area associated with Elbow Bump is located between the tip, or point, of the elbow (called the olecranon) and the overlying skin. This bursa allows the elbow to bend and straighten freely underneath the skin.

Tennis Elbow

Introduction

Lateral epicondylitis, commonly known as tennis elbow, is not limited to tennis players. The backhand swing in tennis can strain the muscles and tendons of the elbow in a way that leads to tennis elbow. But many other types of repetitive activities can also lead to tennis elbow: painting with a brush or roller, running a chainsaw, and using many types of hand tools. Any activities that repeatedly stress the same forearm muscles can cause symptoms of tennis elbow.

Causes of Tennis Elbow

  • Overuse of the muscles and tendons of the forearm and elbow are the most common reason people develop tennis elbow. Apart from competitive sport, Hammering nails, picking up heavy buckets, or pruning shrubs can all cause the pain of tennis elbow.
  • Tennis elbow often does not involve inflammation. Rather, the problem is within the cells of the tendon. Doctors call this condition tendinopathy. In tendinopathy, wear and tear is thought to lead to tissue degeneration. The collagen loses its strength. It becomes fragile and can break or be easily injured. Each time the collagen breaks down, the body responds by forming scar tissue in the tendon. Eventually, the tendon becomes thickened from extra scar tissue.

Symptoms of Tennis Elbow

  • Tenderness and pain that starts on the outside of the elbow. The pain may spread down the forearm. It may go as far as the back of the middle and ring fingers.
  • The forearm muscles may also feel tight and sore. The pain usually gets worse when you bend your wrist backward, turn your palm upward, or hold something with a stiff wrist or straightened elbow.
  • Grasping items also makes the pain worse. Just reaching into the refrigerator to get a carton of milk can cause pain. Sometimes the elbow feels stiff and won’t straighten out completely.